Make Your Own Flavored Cooking Oil

Make Your Own Flavored Cooking Oil

It only takes one trip to the local specialty grocery store to see that flavored cooking oils can be quite expensive. Not long ago, a recipe I was making called for garlic-infused olive oil. It was about $12 at my corner market, which I consider to be highway robbery. I’m a work-at-home mom who has to be careful about where to save and where to splurge, and this was definitely NOT a splurge item for me. So I made my own. It was super easy, and you can make your own flavored cooking oil with any of your favorite herbs and spices. You can even mix flavors and create wonderfully flavored combinations. You can use flavored cooking oil to sauté fish, veggies, or chicken. Substitute it in any recipe that calls for olive oil. You can also use it with your favorite vinegar for salad dressing, and it is to-die-for as a dipping sauce for bread!

Choosing Your Oil

To make your own flavored cooking oil, the first step is to choose your oil. Most any cooking oil will work, so there is no need to purchase the most expensive oil on the shelf. Besides, you are adding flavor to the oil, so it will be delicious. To get a flavor that is closest to the herb or spice you are using, use a more flavorless oil like peanut, corn, vegetable, or canola oil. My personal preference, though, is to use olive oil. While the olive oil has its own distinct flavor which will infuse with the herbs and spices, I actually prefer this blending of flavors because I want the flavor of the olive oil to shine through.

Choosing Your Herbs and Spices

Hands down, my favorite herbs to use to make your own flavored cooking oil are ones that come from my herb garden. Basil and rosemary are my go-to herbs, but I also love to use green onion. Fresh roasted garlic and whole peppercorns are terrific spices to add, and you can adjust the level of punch to your liking. Don’t be afraid to mix herbs and spices together in oils. For an Italian flavored oil, you can combine basil, oregano, and garlic. Another favorite combo is lemon and garlic. When using fresh herbs, I typically add about 15 leaves of basin, about 5 garlic cloves, around 15 peppercorns, a tablespoon of lemon juice, and/or about 5 long sprigs of rosemary.

Choosing Your Container

Most discount stores like Walmart and Target carry olive oil dispensers. They are found in the kitchen section, and they are pretty inexpensive, usually around $5. You can order the Tablecraft Olive Oil Dispenser from Amazon, and I believe it is the one I used when I made this basil oil:

Make Your Own Flavored Cooking Oil

A couple of things to note:

  • Flavored cooking oils will last around ten days in the cabinet or around a month in the fridge. If you refrigerate, give the oil about 20 minutes to come to room temperature before using.
  • Using dried herbs can make the oil last longer, but be aware that chopped herbs can clog up the spout.
  • Flavored cooking oils make a fun gift for your friends and family. Who doesn’t love a handmade gift, especially one that is as useful and thoughtful as this!

Sesame Noodles

Sesame Noodles

We are back in the swing of the fall schedule around here, and that means busy days! Being a homeschooling, stay-at-home mom, I usually cook three meals a day, plus at least a couple of snacks for the girls. I do love cooking, but when our schedule is particularly hectic, I need a meal idea that is quick to prepare, and it doesn’t hurt if it’s inexpensive as well. Sesame Noodles have become a go-to for weekday lunches and late-night meals. They have been a life-saver for me on the days when soccer practice runs late or our daytime schedule is full of errands.

Sesame Noodles

Meals don’t have to be complex to be delicious. Sesame Noodles are among the simplest of meals that I fix, yet they are alive with flavor. We love them best as they are, but you can amp them up with chicken, shrimp, or flank steak. They are also delicious with broccoli, red bell pepper, or steamed carrots thrown in.

When I say Sesame Noodles are simple to make, I’m not kidding. They only require that you boil noodles and mix a sauce. Toss them both together, and you have a magical, tasty dish that can be enjoyed as a one-dish meal or as a side dish. They can also be served either hot or cold.

The Short But Sweet List of Ingredients

One pound of noodles, cooked (I prefer thin spaghetti, but you can use your favorite)
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
3-4 stalks green onion, thinly sliced

The How-To

Boil your noodles, drain, and set aside.

Sesame Noodles

In a separate dish, mix the soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil, ginger, garlic powder, and sugar.

Sesame Noodles

Pour sauce over noodles and toss to coat. Sprinkle green onions and toasted sesame seeds over top. Enjoy!

Sesame Noodles
This simple noodle dish can be served hot or cold. It can also be served as-is or with added chicken, shrimp, steak, or veggies.
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Cook Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup soy sauce
  2. 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  3. 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  4. 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  5. 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  6. 1 teaspoon sugar
  7. 1 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
  8. 3-4 stalks green onion, thinly sliced
Instructions
  1. Boil your noodles, drain, and set aside.
  2. In a separate dish, mix the soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil, ginger, garlic powder, and sugar.
  3. Pour sauce over noodles and toss to coat. Sprinkle green onions and toasted sesame seeds over top. Enjoy!
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